3 Local Art Exhibits To Catch Online

Ashley Wu | September 10, 2020 | Lifestyle

The cultural institutions of Silicon Valley are using technology to keep the arts scene alive. Here are some of our top picks for virtual exhibitions.

Extraviados.jpgAdán Paredes, “Anhelos Extraviados (Lost Longing),” installation at the Sonora Museum of Art

1. Cantor Arts Center

Stanford University’s Cantor Arts Center has launched an educational, online series that allows art aficionados to get their fix even when museums aren’t open. The website features pieces from Cantor’s permanent collection, set alongside information about each piece, including historical backgrounds. For even more interactivity, the “Museums From Home” series immerses visitors in painting tours with artists such as Rebekah Goldstein, Davina Semo and Erica Deeman, as well as virtual gallery talks on everything from art authenticity to the curatorial legacy of Leland Stanford Jr.

2. De Young Museum

Thanks to Google’s documentation of de Young Museum’s art collection, Californians in quarantine can still indulge in their cravings for world-class art from the comfort of their homes. De Young’s collections inspire discourse concerning the intersections of different cultures and time periods. Ruth Asawa’s A Working Life showcases her meditative wire sculptures and the historical impact of Pearl Harbor upon her art. 125 Years of de Young is yet another notable exhibit that provides the story behind the museum itself. The diversity of the pieces makes this exhibition the perfect go-to for getting inspired.

lezama.jpgDaniel Lezama, “Aguila Ciega (Blind Eagle)” (oil on linen)

3. The Mexican Museum

Teaming up with Google Arts & Culture, Silicon Valley’s Mexican Museum is now available for online viewing. The in-person permanent collection features more than 16,000 artworks, but the online exhibit highlights 150 of the Mexican Museum’s most impressive pieces, complete with captions and historical information. The website is even split into different eras, so visitors can track the evolution of these civilizations as time changes. The Pre-Hispanic section features inspired pottery of deities and creatures, giving an insight into the roots of Mexican culture. From Colonial to Chicano art, this interactive exhibit covers all facets of a rich historical tapestry.

jarol.jpgJarol Moreno, “Bosque de cactáceas (Cactus Forest)” (oil on canvas), all part of the Mexican Museum’s partnership with Google Arts and Culture



Tags: art

Photography by: Daniel Lezama photo courtesy of Private Collection,
Monterrey; all others Courtesy of the artists